Indiana becomes first state to pass abortion ban after Roe: NPR


Abortion rights protesters fill the halls of the Indiana State House and clap outside the legislative chambers Friday as lawmakers vote to agree to a near-total ban on abortion in Indianapolis.

Arleigh Rodgers/AP


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Arleigh Rodgers/AP


Abortion rights protesters fill the halls of the Indiana State House and clap outside the legislative chambers Friday as lawmakers vote to agree to a near-total ban on abortion in Indianapolis.

Arleigh Rodgers/AP

Indiana Republican Governor Eric Holcomb signed into law a new law banning abortion on Friday, which will go into effect on September 15.

The bill passed the state House 62-38 earlier in the day on Friday before the state Senate passed it 28-19 on Friday night.

The actions made Indiana the first state to pass new legislation to ban abortion since the Supreme Court struck down Roe vs. Wade At the end of june. Other states have since banned abortion, but have done so through existing trigger laws that took effect once a decision is made. Roe bass

“After Roe was overturned, I clearly stated that I would be willing to support legislation that would make progress in protecting life,” Holcomb said in a statement. “In my opinion, [the bill] achieves this goal after passing both houses of the Indiana General Assembly with a solid majority of support. These actions followed long days of hearings filled with personal and sobering testimony from citizens and elected representatives on this emotional and complex issue.”

Abortion will soon be outlawed in the state, but there are some exceptions, even if a pregnant woman’s life is at risk. There are also exceptions in the law for rape and incest and lethal fetal anomalies, although the law imposes a complicated process for performing abortions under these exceptions.

Physicians in the state who perform illegal abortions will lose their medical licenses.

Among the provisions of the law, it will remove licenses from facilities that currently perform abortions that are not hospitals or outpatient clinics owned by hospitals.

The new law will make Indiana part of a bloc of states in the central US where abortion is prohibited and will force those seeking the procedure to travel further afield.

Planned Parenthood called the legislation “an appalling attack on health care in Indiana” and noted that the group’s facilities will not be able to perform abortions after it takes effect, even under circumstances where exceptions are granted.

“The way Indiana lawmakers have introduced this bill, hastily and without regard for the people it will affect most, is cruel and misplaced,” said Rebecca Gibron, executive director of Planned Parenthood Great Northwest, Hawaii, Alaska, Indiana, Kentucky. “Governor Holcomb turned off his phones, cowered in the face of his constituents, and signed his destiny to a future without bodily autonomy or access to basic health care.”

Businesses within the state are already taking notice of the law. Pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly has more than 10,000 employees in Indianapolis. The company said it is “concerned that this law will hamper Lilly’s, and Indiana’s, ability to attract diverse scientific, engineering and business talent from around the world,” in a statement provided to NPR.

“While we have expanded our employee health plan coverage to include travel for reproductive services that are not available locally, that may not be enough for some current and prospective employees.”

The company said it will have to plan for future growth outside of Indiana, where it has been based for more than 145 years.

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